Sung Kang’s 240Z and the amazing story behind it- #4 at SEMA 2015!

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One of the main characters in the famous American franchise is Han Lue that’s played by Sung Kang. That right, we’re talking about The Fast and Furious series which is Universal’s biggest franchise of all time and it’s particularly appreciated in the automotive community. You may say that there are scenes that have been exaggerated and that the overdone of the storyline is something you really dislike but, you’ll still go and watch the next movie that comes out.

Well, Kang took on a 1973 240Z project and decided to include two of his friends and the GReddy team in it. Their goal was to build a car that would be fun to drive in normal conditions but, still capable of going to the track. So, the car that they have created barely made it to SEMA 2015 but, it was made to be epic. The Volk wheels with the Rocket Bunny kit is a combination that’s right on point. Putting a JDM flare on the style known as “Restomod” is something that’s quite unusual, but pretty awesome. New brakes, new suspension, and an RB26 were one of the things that made this car a true performer. The last thing that was left to do was give this amazing piece a name- FuguZ. Sung explains that the names stems from the Fugu fish; a blowfish that can kill you if you don’t prepare it properly and according to him it’s the same thing with race cars- if you don’t prepare them properly and get on track, they can kill you.

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However, the whole point of building this ride wasn’t the obvious one. The FuguZ is supposed to symbolize the importance of friendship and the car culture in general. Building a car by yourself in the garage isn’t much fun and while you may be proud of yourself when it’s finally done, that feeling can’t be compared to the thrill you’ll experience when you do it with your buddies. All in all, what Sung wants to say is that if you spend quality time with your friends and work together as a team, extraordinary things come to life. A lesson for a lifetime, folks!